Which Career Combines DNA Technology & Medicine?

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Which Career Combines DNA Technology & Medicine?

which career combines DNA technology and medicine I’ve been thinking about the field of biomedicine for a while now, given its incredible diversity,

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which career combines DNA technology and medicine
I’ve been thinking about the field of biomedicine for a while now, given its incredible diversity, but I haven’t come across someone who was really putting it all together, as in “what do I want to do next?”. After reading so much about med-tech, it made me wonder if there would be a place for biology in that kind of industry. We have different skillsets, we are both different people. The best medicine isn’t necessarily an engineering one. And neither is DNA technology. So I decided to start looking into this myself…
What Does It Mean To Do Biom?
Well, let’s put the definition of biome — as a broad term that refers to a wide range of fields, including chemistry, physics, medical science, law, and economics. What does a scientist mean by a biotech company or hospital? Biotech is an organization that makes, markets, and sells drugs. In the world of pharma and medical supplies, such organizations make drugs used to treat diseases, illnesses, and infections. A hospital is a sort of biotech that is more complex than a traditional health institution, with resources, procedures, and staff that might make you think otherwise. This is how biotechnology has evolved into something very useful for patients. Here is a brief explanation of what each word means:
Bio — refers to biological, genetic, or physical elements. These can be anything from bacteria, cells, and molecules (the genes in your body, like genes) to enzymes, proteins and other molecules found all around us. That’s just a way of saying organisms can go wrong. Most drugs you take, whether they’re prescription drugs or things you buy off the shelf, are products of these processes.
Biotech — stands for biotechnology, a broad area of study across many disciplines which combines both life sciences and engineering. This includes pharmaceuticals and devices, tissue engineering, biocatalysis, nano bioscience, and imaging — all of which are making waves at the cutting edge of our knowledge on human health and disease.
Medical — comes from the Latin word medicare, meaning ‘to heal’, and was originally derived from the Greek words medicos ‘medical doctor’, and testimonial ‘surgery’. The idea of a doctor treating patients using all aspects of their bodies, combined with a focus on healing, is still going strong. Today, doctors use tools like X-rays, ultrasound, lab tests, blood work, surgery, and medicine to find answers to questions about their health and often treat their symptoms for free.
This is where the field of gene editing begins to separate itself from biotech. Gene editing uses molecular techniques to change genes, causing abnormal cells to die or disappear, creating new ones, or correcting them. Or gene therapy creates cells from donated tissues: an approach used for treating spinal cord injury by implanting extra cells in the patient and boosting their immune system to fight infection by fighting off any infectious agent within. There has always been some controversy over whether gene therapy should go ahead, but most scientists agree it’s the right approach for treating cancer and helping people find cures for things such as Huntington’s and muscular dystrophy. But with good technology, we could achieve the same results in less time and with fewer side effects. As long as we had enough money and manpower, so do you.
What Is Genetics/Molecular Biology?
Genetics is “the study of hereditary and inherited characteristics that affect organisms and their ability to survive for generations, and thus is central to everything from studying genetics for future human health care to understanding natural and unnatural phenomena in animal evolution,” according to American Cancer Society (ACS). While many scientists have studied this at length, in part because of the complexity it involves, most of us think of DNA as being either a molecule of gene expression — all the protein activity of your brain — or a type of RNA — the instructions (RNA) put in an egg’s genome to code for proteins.
In biology, there are thousands of genes or genes as they’re called here. They encode everything from the color intensity of red skin in yourself to what color fruit you turn out to be when ripe. Each gene is a series of segments of letters – a codon, which translates to an amino acid, which is then encoded by a short piece of your DNA. For a cell to grow and function properly, DNA must be duplicated within it, giving it a unique name in the cell: N, for not-yet-named. When a baby starts out as green skin, the green skin on his father’s hands will turn into brown skin. If he continues to be brown skin, he can become dark brown skin.
The DNA sequence that gives your organism a particular color is already set in stone before birth. Whether you have blonde hair or blue eyes, you were born with them, along with those genes for red skin and brown eyes. Not everything in life has a certain color. You may have purple toes; you might also have hairy feet. All of life, whether it’s animals, plants, or microorganisms, is made up of different forms of one basic substance: matter. Some form of matter is needed for survival, which happens to be water, while another — energy — is produced through chemical reactions in all living things. Energy is required a whole lot of times; all life relies upon it. Our body cannot produce energy without food. So we need to eat to produce it, for example; for example, protein. Protein is made up of the building blocks of proteins. Without protein, the DNA would never get copied to produce new cells and therefore no more organisms would exist. But the process of turning a single form of matter into another is exactly what makes up life: proteins. Once a simple chemical reaction happens, it leads to the production of energy. This is just a small example of the way the process works at the molecular level which gives all things life such as a blue moon. This is a simplified version, but you see the picture.
The Genome
A tiny bit of genetic information can make or break a person. One tiny bug can ruin your chances of getting a job; perhaps you have more genetic defects than you’d like to admit, or maybe you can’t afford treatment, or you don’t get sick easily, or you have a few annoying traits that you won’t like. Each time you pass a trait onto someone else, it alters how they function which is why it’s important not to pass genes onto others. Every gene in the world makes someone who they are, and if the gene is passed on to somebody who doesn’t have the gene, then they don’t have it because what it makes doesn’t match what they are. On one hand, it’s a sad state of affairs because if all of nature’s organisms were perfect organisms, we couldn’t exist on earth, and no human would be able to enjoy our daily lives. Another reason it’s worrying is that when we have gene mutations or diseases in this case, our population is constantly growing, and we have to try and adapt for ever more of life.
The Human Body
Everybody we’re talking about is made up of trillions of molecules called DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid), which are strands of genetic material. Think of it as the alphabet of your language. Each letter represents a base and an amino acid. Since the genetic codes of humans and other organisms differ a bit, a mutation in one section of DNA makes a huge difference in what it makes. Just like if you cut both sides of a book and put it back together, you’re telling the reader that some parts of your book are better than others. However, the opposite is true too. An entire section of your book is worse than a little portion. This is how genetics works. Each strand of DNA holds a copy of every gene that makes your body. Even though the only purpose of DNA is to tell genes to create molecules of proteins and other structures, we can manipulate or destroy the information of how your genes produce protein chains — basically who you are. At least one person in every 100 will have a mistake or deletion of one of every 2,000 genes. The average person in every country around the globe will have one typo per five thousand years. Therefore most of us pass on our genes to our children or grandchildren, and they eventually fill every pore in our organs. In fact, the worst genetic defect an adult can have is aneuploidy, otherwise known as low sperm count. Fortunately, since a high sperm count makes sperm even rarer and harder to fertilize, only around 1 in 10 people who have the disease will carry a functional pregnancy.
The Future Of BioMed
The main aim of biotechnology is to improve on existing methods of providing medical treatments. If they’re effective and safe in producing an outcome, then they should become widespread everywhere. But is this possible? The drug development market is enormous at the thought of it. From medicines for depression to antibiotics for gonorrhea to HIV/AIDS treatments, there are countless ways of making a profit through drugs. With billions of dollars invested in research, and millions of human beings trying to figure out how to best approach these difficult issues, how will this progress? Maybe gene therapies are the answer. No matter how it gets, gene therapies, or gene replacement therapies, as mentioned above, are likely to solve the many problems we face, especially when it comes to treating serious conditions.
You don’t want to use the word ‘gene’ too lightly, because not all genes are created equal.